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French Chop Down Historic ‘Name Trees’ Carved by U.S. Soldiers During Normandy Invasion

The beech trees of Saint Pierre de Varengeville-Duclair forest in France bore a poignant testimony to the D-Day landings for more than six decades. Thousands of American soldiers stationed there after the liberation of Normandy spent their spare hours with a knife or bayonet creating a lasting reminder of their presence.

Although the trees grew and the graffiti swelled and twisted, this most peculiar memory of one of the 20th century’s defining moments remained visible — until now. Amid bureaucratic indifference and a dispute between officials and the forest owner, most of the trees have been felled, chopped up and turned into paper.

Click here to read more on this story from The Times of London.

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